Great Foods for Your Eyes

Indeed, it isn’t just carrots that are great for the health of your eyes. Many different, whole foods enhance and protect your eyes from things like macular degeneration, contact with free radicals, dry eye syndrome and more. Read on to see which foods to target for optimal vision and to decrease your chances from developing problems.

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Mixed Nuts

Vitamin E is found firmly in almonds, cashews, peanuts and other nuts. Vitamin E serves to protect your cell’s eyes from free radicals…which can break down healthy tissue in your eyes.

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Oranges

Most know that vitamin C is a big part of oranges. Well, this lovely vitamin serves to promote healthy eyes as it keeps blood vessels healthy…which helps to lower the risk of developing cataracts.

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Spinach

Popeye ate spinach to get strong. You should eat spinach, which is high in vitamin C and beta-carotene, as works to protect your eyes from harmful blue light. These nutrients also serve to reduce the chances of developing cataracts and/or macular degeneration.

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Salmon

Salmon contains DHA, otherwise known as fatty acids. Found in many kinds of fish (not just salmon), fatty acids help keep your eyes moist and reduce the chances of developing dry eye syndrome.

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Red Meat

Red meat contains a high level of zinc, which is an excellent vitamin for your eyes as it sends vitamin A to your retinas from your liver. This action, in turn, produces melanin that serves to protect your eyes pigment. Not having enough zinc can lead to vision issues such as cataracts and problems with night vision.

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Carrots

Last but not least…carrots. Yes, we all know carrots are key for the eyes…but why? Well, vitamin A…which, as noted in the red meat section above, is key in preventing issues including cataracts and problems with night vision. However, and contrary to popular belief, carrots do not improve your vision (only protect).

Read more about protecting your eyes in these past blog posts:

Protecting Your Eyes This Summer

What is Glaucoma?

Dan Meyers