Visit the World's Smallest Park

Most of the time, “bigger is better.” This is true in terms of paychecks, hot tubs and the power of your truck when it comes to snow-covered roads. Yet some things are simply cool when tiny. Take today’s focus, Mill Ends Park…the Guiness Book of World Record’s-certified smallest park in the world. And you guessed it, that tiny park is right here in Portland.

This is the Guiness Book of World Record’s-certified “World’s Smallest Park,” — specifically, Mill Ends Park in good ol’ PDX. Image Courtesy: bucketlistjourney.com

This is the Guiness Book of World Record’s-certified “World’s Smallest Park,” — specifically, Mill Ends Park in good ol’ PDX. Image Courtesy: bucketlistjourney.com

Here’s a nice description of the park from World Atlas.com:

At 452 square inches, Mill Ends Park is the smallest park in the world. It has held this distinction since 1971, when it was recognized by the Guinness Book of Records. This park, established in 1948, is located in Portland, Oregon in a median along southwest Naito Parkway. It is managed by Portland’s Parks and Recreation Department.
— - WorldAtlas.com
Here’s how the park looked in 2004 (hence the grainy image). It’s always changing, and often the site of events and celebrations (as well as protests!). What will it look like when you visit? Image Courtesy: CNN.com

Here’s how the park looked in 2004 (hence the grainy image). It’s always changing, and often the site of events and celebrations (as well as protests!). What will it look like when you visit? Image Courtesy: CNN.com

Here’s how the park looked in 2012…entirely different! Image Courtesy: CNN.com

Here’s how the park looked in 2012…entirely different! Image Courtesy: CNN.com

The park has a very interesting history with a number of things happening on and around it in the last 48 years. Here is a brief history from WorldAtlas.com, followed by a number of very entertaining and fun links to stories about the park and its legendary inhabitant, leprechaun Patrick O’toole!

This park was originally designated as a site for a light pole. However, the city failed to have it installed. As something of a practical joke, an Oregon Journal newspaper reporter, Dick Fagan, decided to plant flowers in the space. The park’s creator, whose office overlooked the median, named the park after his newspaper column, “Mill Ends.” Mill ends is a term used to refer to the unused scraps of wood left over at lumber yards. The story about the park caught on, and on St. Patrick’s Day in 1948, the city celebrated the park’s official dedication ceremony. At the time, they can refer to it as the “only leprechaun colony west of Ireland.”
— - WorldAtlas.com
All kinds of statements have been made in this tiny little park. Just check out the various things happening above. This pic was supposedly shot in 2012. Image Courtesy: WorldAtlas.com

All kinds of statements have been made in this tiny little park. Just check out the various things happening above. This pic was supposedly shot in 2012. Image Courtesy: WorldAtlas.com

Interesting Story Links About Mill Ends Park

Indeed a number of things have occurred in and around Mill Ends Park. Afterall, it’s right on the PDX waterfront. So, here are some great links to explore further this wonderful, truly Portland-like installation. I just love it!

11 Fun Facts About Mill Ends Park, Portland’s Leprechaun Colony

A Brief History of Mill Ends Park

Tree stolen from Mill Ends Park

What will the park look like when you go check it out??? Enjoy!

Dan Meyers